4/20-4/29 – Workshop (including Prompts)

Daily warm up: Each Day

Wednesday, we’ll upload the piece we want to workshop into our class document.

Once we have that, I’ll re-assign a new document to you so you get your own copy and you can start reading and commenting.

Beginning on Thursday and continuing through until next Friday, you will read and comment on the work of the “next FIVE” different writers in the workshop document each night. In class, we will talk about what we’ve read.

Your workshop participation is a major component of your grade, and it’s evaluated based on…

  • Quality of your written and oral comments: are they based on the prompts/topics we’ve practiced and studied, do they address specific issues in the text, etc. You will be turning in your written comments at the end of our workshop time (April 29). NO LATE WRITTEN COMMENTS will be accepted.
  • Quantity of your oral comments (3 per day for 15/15 points, 2 per day for 12/12 points, 1 per day for 10/15 points).

Prompts for Poetry Workshop

  • Identifying any “green lines” (lines so good you wish you had written them)
  • How did the writer handle lineation? Why did she/he break the lines where s/he did?
  • In our round table, we talked about personification, metaphor, inversion, specificity, the FORM of a poem matching the MEANING, and how titles help us interpret the poem. If you see these elements in one of your peers’ poems, point it out.
  • Point out literary tools you think work really well (literary tools might be things like metaphors, imagery, sound, etc).
  • Identify elements of craft that you admire in the poem. By “elements of craft” I mean things we’ve talked about (like specificity/concrete language, playfulness, indirect metaphor, etc.)
  • Point out other things you notice about how the poem was built (how the poet handled line length or punctuation or stanzas, grammar, word choice, sentence structure, etc.)

Prompts for Fiction Workshop

  • What green lines did you have and why were they green?
  • Where did you see writers using the skills we talked about last week?
    • Showing instead of telling
    • Believable dialogue
    • Interiority & Exteriority
    • Elements of plot (included or implied)
  • What else stood out to you about the works you read?
  • How do these writers avoid info-dumps and cliche? What do they do instead?
  • Are all the elements of plot present? Do they need to be?
  • Pointing out literary tools you think work really well (literary tools might be things like metaphors, imagery, sound, etc).
  • Pointing out other things you notice about how the story was built (how the writer handled punctuation or stanzas, grammar, word choice, sentence structure, etc.)
  • Focusing on craft–how is the writer handling the beginning, ending, description, dialogue.

Prompts for NonFiction Workshop

  • What are your green lines? Why?
  • How does this writer “show” rather than “tell?” Is it effective? Why or why not?
  • Where do you see this writer using motif, riff, or juxtaposition?
  • Where do you guess this writer is slanting the truth or approximating it versus giving all the “facts?” Why do they do it that way? Is it effective? Why or why not?
  • What type of form is this writer using? Do you think it’s effective? Why or why not? In class, we looked at non-fiction via poetry, letters, dictionary definitions, and the lyric essay (a series of poetic reflections around a particular concept or idea). But there are lots of others, as we saw in the warm up today.
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